Thursday, September 21, 2017

Word for the day by Christian Education Forum

New Vision
Luke 18:35-43
Vs. 42 Jesus said to him, “Receive your sight; your faith has saved you.” 
God often uses the most simple and unlikely people to teach us the most profound spiritual lessons.  And the same holds true in this passage where we are able to learn from the blind beggar that Jesus heals as he approached Jericho.  In order to learn from the blind beggar, we must all admit that we are spiritually without vision and spiritually impoverished.  Without Jesus in our lives, we will remain in darkness, in a state of spiritual blindness.  Not only will we be rendered blind, but we will be reduced to being spiritually destitute, left without anything of real spiritual value to bless and enrich our lives
In this passage, the blind beggar intrinsically realized his need for both physical and spiritual healing.  Thus, when he heard that Jesus was passing by, he immediately began to shout and cry out for help, for he knew that Jesus was the only one who could provide what he needed. Even when others tried to discourage him, he cried even louder to draw Jesus’s gracious attention.  The blind man’s humble plea for help and his faithful persistence imply that he was truly hopeful that Jesus could actually save and heal him.
 What we are to understand is that Jesus still provides this great hope for each and every one of us today.  All that Jesus requires is that we come to him humbly and faithfully, admitting our spiritual poverty.  When the blind beggar calls out to Jesus saying – “Jesus, Son of David, have mercy on me!” – he is confessing that he is in desperate need of God’s grace and mercy. Thus, we are called to confess the same, so that when we experience the healing of God’s grace and mercy, we will be humbled by it and not become haughty.
 When the blind man received God’s grace and healing, he was humbled by it and responded gratefully to it by immediately following Jesus and glorifying God.  We have to remember that are recipients of God’s grace and mercy each and every day of life. The question before us is this: how do we respond to God’s grace?  Often times, we consume divine blessings without even an afterthought of appreciation.  We have to remind ourselves that we actually do nothing to merit or earn God’s grace and blessings.  These are offered to us freely out of God’s great and unconditional love for us.  Thus, we should be humbled and should be led to following Jesus and serving him with our whole hearts so that we can faithfully and fruitfully live for the glory of our Lord. 
 PRAYER
Loving God, we pray that you provide us the vision to see your loving-kindness in all instances of our lives.  Help us to be thankful for all the times that we have been healed by your mercy and grace.  Enable us, O Lord, to faithfully respond to you with hearts of humility and implant in us the desire to serve you all the days of our lives.  In the name of Jesus Christ, our Lord and Savior, we pray. Amen. 
THOUGHT FOR THE DAY
“For grace is given not because we have done good works, but in order that we may be able to do them.” (Saint Augustine)

Rev. Christopher Daniel, Youth Chaplain, ChicagoNew Vision
Luke 18:35-43
Vs. 42 Jesus said to him, “Receive your sight; your faith has saved you.” 
God often uses the most simple and unlikely people to teach us the most profound spiritual lessons.  And the same holds true in this passage where we are able to learn from the blind beggar that Jesus heals as he approached Jericho.  In order to learn from the blind beggar, we must all admit that we are spiritually without vision and spiritually impoverished.  Without Jesus in our lives, we will remain in darkness, in a state of spiritual blindness.  Not only will we be rendered blind, but we will be reduced to being spiritually destitute, left without anything of real spiritual value to bless and enrich our lives
In this passage, the blind beggar intrinsically realized his need for both physical and spiritual healing.  Thus, when he heard that Jesus was passing by, he immediately began to shout and cry out for help, for he knew that Jesus was the only one who could provide what he needed. Even when others tried to discourage him, he cried even louder to draw Jesus’s gracious attention.  The blind man’s humble plea for help and his faithful persistence imply that he was truly hopeful that Jesus could actually save and heal him.
 What we are to understand is that Jesus still provides this great hope for each and every one of us today.  All that Jesus requires is that we come to him humbly and faithfully, admitting our spiritual poverty.  When the blind beggar calls out to Jesus saying – “Jesus, Son of David, have mercy on me!” – he is confessing that he is in desperate need of God’s grace and mercy. Thus, we are called to confess the same, so that when we experience the healing of God’s grace and mercy, we will be humbled by it and not become haughty.
 When the blind man received God’s grace and healing, he was humbled by it and responded gratefully to it by immediately following Jesus and glorifying God.  We have to remember that are recipients of God’s grace and mercy each and every day of life. The question before us is this: how do we respond to God’s grace?  Often times, we consume divine blessings without even an afterthought of appreciation.  We have to remind ourselves that we actually do nothing to merit or earn God’s grace and blessings.  These are offered to us freely out of God’s great and unconditional love for us.  Thus, we should be humbled and should be led to following Jesus and serving him with our whole hearts so that we can faithfully and fruitfully live for the glory of our Lord. 
 PRAYER
Loving God, we pray that you provide us the vision to see your loving-kindness in all instances of our lives.  Help us to be thankful for all the times that we have been healed by your mercy and grace.  Enable us, O Lord, to faithfully respond to you with hearts of humility and implant in us the desire to serve you all the days of our lives.  In the name of Jesus Christ, our Lord and Savior, we pray. Amen. 
THOUGHT FOR THE DAY
“For grace is given not because we have done good works, but in order that we may be able to do them.” (Saint Augustine)

Rev. Christopher Daniel, Youth Chaplain, Chicago